Mont Saint Michel Bay

One of the most beautiful bays in the world

Mont Saint Michel Bay
Mont Saint Michel Bay
Mont Saint Michel Bay
Mont Saint Michel Bay
Mont Saint Michel Bay
 PHOTOS

Mont-Saint-Michel bay is surrounded by the English Channel which laps at its shores.  Stretching from Granville, in Nor­mandy, to Cancale, in Brittany, Mont- Saint-Michel Bay is rich in shellfish, fish and crustaceans.

 

The Norman side of Mont Saint Michel bay

You will find scallops and whelks from the port of Granville, and Chausey Island lobsters further out to sea.  Fishing in this area is strictly regulated and reserved for just a few local fisher­men.

The Breton side of Mont Saint Michel bay

On the other side of the bay, the Breton port of Cancale specialises in oyster farming whilst a large part of the coast is edged with wooden stakes used in mussel farming.  The remaining fishermen at the foot of the bay gather cockles and go shrimping, tirelessly pushing their heavy nets ahead of them.

Further out, flotillas of small fishing boats catch bass, mackerel, sole, plaice, turbot and haul up their cages groaning with edible spider crabs from the seabed.

Finally, a few experts fish for salmon which swim in the rivers Sée and Sélune; a species which was so abundant in the past that workers in the region used to have a clause in their contracts that under no circumstances were they to be served salmon more than three times in any one week !

Polders and farmland

The polders are another important characteristic in the bay.  These fertile lands are largely given over to vegetable production: sweet- flavoured carrots, small new potatoes, tender and crisp salads, along with pink shallots... a unique range of crops produced only in the bay.

Where the polders end, the typical farm landscapes of Normandy and Brittany reassert their rights : this is the domain of corn-fed chicken, duck bred for its foie gras, farm pigs, Norman and Breton cattle, eggs, milk, butter, cream...   There are also apple and pear orchards, cider and perry-making and sometimes Calvados.